The many different options to getting sex addiction help

We’ve talked about the fact that sex addiction (or love addiction) is defined by the inability to regulate sexual behavior despite negative consequences. We also mentioned already that it affects millions of Americans. But how does one get sex addiction help?

Addictive sexual behaviors can range from compulsive masturbation and porn watching, to compulsive cheating, to pedophilia. If left untreated, sexual addiction can severely interrupt daily functions and prevent meaningful relationships from forming. Fortunately, specialized treatment centers for sexual addiction are becoming more and more available. In fact, David Duchovny, an actor known to have sexual compulsion issues, just checked himself into one of those treatment centers.

Sex addiction help options

There are a number of behavioral and pharmacological therapies that are commonly used to treat compulsive sexual disorders. This review of sex addiction help options is not exhaustive by any means, but it’s long, so take your time:

Individual therapy can help patients address any underlying issues that may be contributing to their abnormal sexual behavior. Surveys of sex addicts show that up to 40% have anxiety disorders, 50% have substance abuse disorders, and 70% have mood disorders (1). Resolving these issues can greatly increase a patient’s chances for a successful recovery from sexual compulsion. There are many different forms of individual-psychotherapy, including Freudian, humanistic, and object centered. The important thing is to find a therapist that fits the patient’s individual style and that makes them feel comfortable.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is very common in treating sexual addiction. CBT teaches its patients to correct irrational thoughts, beliefs, and feelings that lead to addictive sexual behavior (1). In practice, this is often done by role playing, journal keeping, and actual workbook homework. By adopting a healthy mindset, patients can better understand their urges and prevent relapse into unhealthy sexual behaviors. CBT can be practiced within individual sessions or as a form of group therapy.

Group therapy and 12-step programs based on the Alcoholics Anonymous model provide a non-hostile environment where patients can share their experiences and provide support for each other during recovery. Shame, a major issue for sexual addiction, is often best dealt with in a group setting. (2)

Family counseling and couples counseling are also common during recovery. Counseling can help rebuild trust and intimacy that has been lost as a result of compulsive sexual behavior (3). Like individual therapy, these forms of counseling allow for a slightly more tailored, personal approach.

Drug therapy may be used in conjunction with psychotherapy to treat sexual addiction. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and lithium have been reported to reduce the frequency and intensity of urges to engage in addictive sexual behaviors (2). In more serious cases of sexual addiction such as sexual predation, gonadotropin-releasing hormone and chemical castration agents may be administered to reduce sexual drive. These forms of therapy can allow a reduction in the compulsions that drive the behavior, sometimes allowing the patient to better focus on the therapeutic efforts.

Sex addiction bears great resemblance to substance abuse. However, the goal in treating sexual addiction is not abstinence, but the development of healthy sexual practices (who wants a life without sex?). Compared to substance abusers, it generally takes longer for sex addicts to adopt a healthy lifestyle.

What to expect from sex addiction help

The first year is the most turbulent and poses the greatest risk for relapse as the patient is often experiencing difficulties with their occupation, relationships, or health as a result of their addiction. From the second year of recovery and onward, patients begin to regain the ability to form meaningful relationships and move forward in their personal life (4). However, patients often find that the struggle with their addiction is ongoing, at least for the first few years of their “recovery.” Considering how long it took for the unhealthy habits to develop, it’s no surprise that a substantial amount of time is often needed to reconfigure them.

The important thing is to have support and to take your time. My wife and I work with couples and individuals who struggle with sex addiction and intimacy issues and often times, in addition to the work, it requires patience and the passage of time. Success often comes on the 2nd, 3rd, or even on a later treatment attempt. If the motivation is there, the chance of beating sexual addiction is good. Keep your focus and try different options or combinations.

If you’re interested in working with us, please contact us and we will be in touch as soon as possible.

Citations:

1. Briken, P., Habermann, N., Berner, W., and Hill, A.(2007) Diagnosis and Treatment of Sexual Addiction: A Survey among German Sex Therapist, Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity,14:2,131 – 143

2. Schneider, J.P. & Irons, R.R. (2001) Assessment and treatment of addictive sexual disorders: Relevance for chemical dependency relapse, Substance Use & Misuse, 36(13).

3. Salisbury, R.M.(2008) Out of control sexual behaviours: a developing practice model, Sexual and Relationship Therapy,23:2,131 – 139

4. Goodman, A. (1998) Sexual addiction: Diagnosis and treatment, Psychiatric Times, 15(5)