More addiction cures: Early promise for Risperidone in crystal meth addiction

A recent open label study found some support for the effectiveness of a Risperidone injection, given once every 2 weeks, in reducing crystal meth (speed) use.

The 22 patients who participated reduced their weekly crystal meth use from an average of 4 times per week to only 1 time per week. The difference between those who were able to stay completely clean and the others seemed to have to do with the levels of Risperidone in the blood.

The nice thing about using an injection as addiction treatment is that it removes the possibility of patients choosing not to take their medication on any given day. Such non-adherence to treatment is very often found to be the reason for relapse.

This study will need to be followed up by placebo-controlled double-blind studies, but given Risperidone’s action as a Dopamine antagonist, I suspect that those trials will also show a strong treatment effect. The promise of medicines as addiction treatment cures always seems great, but I believe that at best, they can be an additional tool to be used in conjunction with other therapies.

The question will be whether the side-effects common with antipsychotic medication will be well-tolerated by enough people to make the drug useful for addiction treatment.

Reduce HIV Transmission – Shooting up, clean needles, and addiction treatment

Co-authored by: Jamie Felzer

We’ve talked often on this  site about many of the negative things that often come along with heavy drug use. We’ve not yet talked about any of the factors that make injection drug use even worse. Users inject cocaine, crystal meth, and heroin, or any combination of these.

Shooting up and disease

In addition to all of the other, addiction-relevant, factors we’ve talked about on here, injection drug use brings about the worry of blood borne pathogens, especially HIV and Hepatitis C.  While it may not always be easy to find clean needles or worry about cleaning a needle between uses there are steps that can be taken to reduce the risk of transmission.

1. Get Tested!!  HIV/AIDS testing is available all over the world, often for free.   Having another STD or illness can easily kill someone with AIDS. Know your status!

President Obama just finalized a plan to revoke the 22 year travel ban on those living with HIV/AIDS.  This will significantly reduce the stigma of HIV/AIDS and should bring about more testing centers and education.  See this video to hear Obama.

2. While it may not always be easy, take great care to try to check the needle for visible signs of blood before injecting. If you think the needle may have been used before, clean it with bleach or another disinfectant.

3. Utilize the free clinics around your town that give out free, clean needles.  They are there to help you!!  Use these addiction support centers for clean needles and other equipment (like the bleach I mentioned earlier).

4. Talk about it! Regardless of where you may live, the group of people you hang out, studies have shown that talking about this subject matter increases awareness and can decrease chance of infections.  Being informed is your most important tool. For more info check out AIDS Global Information or AIDS Action.

5. Get help! Treatment options are widely available and they serve as a very effective method for reducing risky behaviors.  We can offer you placement help if you’re in southern California, but even if not SAMHSA has a relatively good addiction treatment locator – Check it out.

Citation:

CAPS Fact Sheet: What are IDU HIV Prevention Needs?

Doctor prescription drug use: Addiction fears no one

The story published today by the Baltimore Sun (see here) is another sad reminder that no one is safe from addiction.

Two doctors of pharmacology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine were apparently developing quite a drug habit buying prescription drugs online and then cooking them and shooting them up. Now one of them is dead and the other is in jail looking at some serious time.

I’m not going to repeat the whole story here, but you should go read it.  Prescription drug use is a growing problem in the U.S., apparently, like other addictions, it doesn’t discriminate.