Teens and drugs: Drug use statistics and treatment that works

Here are some drug use statistics:

  • Over 80% of teens engage in some form of deviant behavior (1).
  • Over 50% of high-school seniors admit to having used drugs (2).
  • Only 10%-15% of the population develop drug addiction problems related to their drug use (1).

The question is:

If the majority of teens experiment with drug use, and so few eventually develop drug addiction problems, should we be focusing on something other than stopping kids from trying drugs? Continue reading “Teens and drugs: Drug use statistics and treatment that works”

Take Charge of your Life: Another adolescent substance abuse prevention program that doesn’t work.

In a previous post we talked about the ineffectiveness of the school-based substance abuse prevention program called D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse Resistance Education). We reported data from a meta-analysis of 11 studies which showed no significant effect of D.A.R.E. in reducing drug use. A recently published study examined the effectiveness of another school-based program called Take Charge of Your Life (TCYL)
TCYL was developed in 1999 as part of the Adolescent Substance Abuse Prevention Study (ASAPS). The ASAPS was a response to the criticism D.A.R.E. was receiving at the time. The goal of the study was to create a more effective program that could utilize D.A.R.E. funding and resources.
The TCYL curriculum consists of 10 lessons in the seventh grade and 7 lessons in the ninth grade which are all taught by trained D.A.R.E. Officers. The TCYL lessons inform students of the personal, social, and legal risks involved with drug use and provide accurate statistical data on drug use. The general philosophy of TCYL is to actively engage students and allow them to make a choice to not use drugs. Like D.A.R.E., the TCYL courses teach communication, decision-making, assertiveness, and refusal skills.
To determine the effectiveness of TCYL, 20,000 seventh graders were enrolled in the study and followed through the ninth grade. Roughly half of these students received the TCYL curriculum while the other half did not.
The results from the study show a negative effect, where TCYL actually increased alcohol and cigarette use among baseline nonusers, compared to students who did not receive TCYL. Clearly, this is not what the developers of TCYL were hoping to see. However, what is equally interesting from the results is a positive effect, where TCYL decreased marijuana use among students who were already using marijuana when the study began. This finding reinforces the idea that people can be affected by the same program differently.
Perhaps the lesson to be learned from the mixed results of TCYL is that prevention programs need to be designed to take into account people’s individual differences. The traditional “one size fits all” approach to prevention may not be the most effective
*D.A.R.E. has not adopted the TCYL curriculum and will continue to teach the relatively new “keepin’ it REAL” curriculum, whose effectiveness has yet to be determined.

Teen smoke

Contributing co-author: Andrew Chen

In a previous post we talked about the ineffectiveness of the school-based substance abuse prevention program called D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse Resistance Education). We reported data from a meta-analysis of 11 studies which showed no significant effect of D.A.R.E. in reducing drug use. A recently published study examined the effectiveness of another school-based program called Take Charge of Your Life (TCYL).

TCYL was developed in 1999 as part of the Adolescent Substance Abuse Prevention Study (ASAPS). The ASAPS was a response to the criticism D.A.R.E. was receiving at the time. The goal of the study was to create a more effective program that could utilize D.A.R.E. funding and resources.

The TCYL curriculum consists of 10 lessons in the seventh grade and 7 lessons in the ninth grade which are all taught by trained D.A.R.E. Officers. The TCYL lessons inform students of the personal, social, and legal risks involved with drug use and provide accurate statistical data on drug use. The general philosophy of TCYL is to actively engage students and allow them to make a choice to not use drugs. Like D.A.R.E., the TCYL courses teach communication, decision-making, assertiveness, and refusal skills.

To determine the effectiveness of TCYL, 20,000 seventh graders were enrolled in the study and followed through the ninth grade. Roughly half of these students received the TCYL curriculum while the other half did not.

The results from the study show a negative effect, where TCYL actually increased alcohol and cigarette use among baseline nonusers, compared to students who did not receive TCYL. Clearly, this is not what the developers of TCYL were hoping to see. However, what is equally interesting from the results is a positive effect, where TCYL decreased marijuana use among students who were already using marijuana when the study began. This finding reinforces the idea that people can be affected by the same program differently.

Perhaps the lesson to be learned from the mixed results of TCYL is that prevention programs need to be designed to take into account people’s individual differences. In addition to previous drug use, developers need to understand how race, gender, personality, and other individual variables affect the success or failure of their program. Without this understanding, “one size fits all” programs like D.A.R.E. and TCYL can easily end up causing more harm than good.

*D.A.R.E. has not adopted the TCYL curriculum and continues to teach the relatively new “keepin’ it REAL” curriculum, whose effectiveness has yet to be determined.

Citation:

Sloboda, Z., Stephens, R.C. , Grey, S.S., Teasdale, B, Hawthorne, R.D., Williams, J., and Marquette, J.F. (2009) The adolescent substance abuse prevention study: A randomized field trial of a universal substance abuse prevention program. Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 102(1-3)

More drug addiction research from CPDD: Teenage smoking, childhood trauma, and marijuana withdrawal

Today, I’ll give a short summary of a few interesting talks I saw at the conference:

  1. Teenage smoking – Children of mothers who used drugs during pregnancy had abnormal stress hormone levels. When assessed over time, their abnormal stress response was associated with an earlier onset (age of first use) of cigarettes smoking and an increased amount and frequency of smoking cigarettes.
  2. Childhood trauma and drug use – Children who experienced excessive childhood trauma had altered brain activity (in the Nucleus Accumbens specifically) and showed increased anxiety. This area, which is important for essentially all learning, was differentially activated in a way that correlated with the amount of childhood trauma.
  3. Marijuana withdrawal and relapse to marijuana use – Marijuana withdrawal, which might soon be added to the APA‘s DSM (in version 5) was characterized as: Increased irritability, restlessness, and misery, reduced sleep quality, sleep duration, and food intake. When tested, restlessness, sleep disturbance, and early wakening were found to be predictors of relapse among participating marijuana users.