Disgusting cigarette packs in Australia

Its seems like we already know the health risks of smoking here in the US with common phrases like “Pass me a cancer stick?” But the Australian government wants its citizens to get a clear image of what they are getting themselves into.

Australian cigarette packs are now more disgusting than ever!!!As of December 2012, in Australia the cigarette packs will not have brand labels or glossy colored packages. They will only contain large health warnings and gruesome images on a dull color paper backing. Images could be anything from a sickly child on a respirator, to a gangrenous foot or rotting teeth. The hope is that by making the packaging unattractive (scary?) potential smokers will pass on them.

Experts in Australia say they don’t expect the change to have a major impact on existing smokers. However, findings from The World Health Organization Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic, 2011 demonstrated that pictorial labels have an ability to significantly reduce the number of current smokers and those picking up the habit.

The proportion of smokers in Australia is relatively low compared to the US and Europe, with only 2.5% of 12-17 year olds and 15% of adults smoking everyday. Australia believes the country will benefit economically ($31 Billion) from reducing the number of smoking related deaths and diseases in the country. The benefit greatly outweighs the amount the country gains in tax revenue from tobacco sales ($5.8 Billion).

Tobacco companies absolutely detest the decision, arguing it is unlawful acquisition of their property and they plan to challenge it in Australian high court. Whether or not other countries follow Australia’s lead may depend on the outcomes in the Australian high court, as well as the outcomes in the public health arena. The US planned on mandating graphic health warnings on packets starting September 2012, but because of a subsequent legal suit from tobacco companies the requirement has been put on hold.

Tobacco smoking alone isn’t enough: More than smoking important in lung cancer death

Christopher Russell and Adi Jaffe

The tobacco epidemic already kills 5.4 million people a year from lung cancer, heart disease and other illnesses. By 2030, the death toll will exceed eight million a year. Unless urgent action is taken tobacco could kill one billion people during this century. (The World Health Organization Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic, 2008)

These are some scary numbers, right? Cigarette smoking, according to the WHO, is the single most preventable cause of death in the world today, and in conveying these deadly statistics to the general public, cigarettes have come to be alternatively referred to by smokers and non-smokers as “cancer sticks”, “nicotine bullets”, and “coffin nails”.

But does smoking really ‘kill’ anybody in the literal sense with which we use this word?  To an epidemiologist, tobacco smoking (nor many other drugs of abuse for that matter) does not “kill” a person or “cause” illness or death in the way the words “kill” and “cause” are typically understood by the media and general public. For example, if I shoot someone in the head, stab another in the heart, and strangle a third till he stops breathing, it is reasonable to say that my actions were the direct, sole, and sufficient causes of death – I would have killed them. Smoking, however, is often neither a sole nor sufficient ‘cause’ of lung cancer, coronary heart disease, or myocardial infarction because non-smokers die from these diseases, and for example, because only 1 in 10 heavy smokers die from lung cancer when one looks at the overall numbers. Continue reading “Tobacco smoking alone isn’t enough: More than smoking important in lung cancer death”

About Addiction: Prescription Medication, Anti Smoking, Alcohol, Ecstasy, and Marijuana

We have the newest links about addiction. This week we feature info on cough medicine, prescription medication, smoking, alcohol, ecstasy, and marijuana. Let us know what you think and leave us your feedback.

Cough and Prescription Medication

CNN Health: The trend for kids to abuse cough medicine is either back, or never left since my days in high-school. Kids get high from a large dose of dextromethorphan, the active ingredient in Robitussin, hence the trend’s nickname “Robo tripping”.

Health Day: Substance abuse treatment admissions of prescription medication (mostly pain relievers) have increased over 400 percent during 10 years. The proportion of admissions for abusers increased from 2.2 percent in 1998 to 9.8 percent in 2008.

Anti Smoking Campaign

New York Times: According to federal officials, the nation has failed to reach its 2010 health goal of reducing high school smoking to 16 percent. They called in report for a resurgence of anti-smoking advertisements.

USA Today: New York became the first American city to require stores to post 4-square-foot warnings showing the physical effects of smoking near tobacco displays or smaller ones at each register. Last month, a few retailers and the nation’s three big tobacco companies sued the city to stop the posters.

Alcohol and Binge-Drinking

Journal Watch: Binge-drinking adolescents are 2.3 to 3.0 times more likely than non-bingers to continue this behavior into their 30s. Striking changes in brain morphology persisted even after alcohol cessation in monkeys exposed to alcohol.

Science Daily: Teens tend to increase their alcohol consumption in summer. Experts suggest parents monitor their children during summer breaks.

Cesar Fax: Of the sexually active high school students 22% reported that they used alcohol or drugs before their last sexual intercourse. Males are significantly more likely than females to report using alcohol or drugs prior to having sex.

Ecstasy and Marijuana

The Partnership: Last year Ecstasy use showed a 67 percent increase, and last year marijuana use showed a 19 percent increase, reversing a declining trend. Could decriminalization and medical marijuana be the reason?, high

Los Angeles Times: An estimated 555,000 Americans older than 12 have used Ecstasy in the last month. Ecstasy is a synthetic amphetamine that is been around for nearly 100 years. If you haven’t read about the death’s at the Los Angeles area rave EDC look here.

About Addiction: Basics, Smoking and drugs

Whether you are interested in addiction as a whole or specific drugs, we have it all here.  Read on for some interesting breaking news and informative articles.

Addiction Basics

Addiction in Recovery: Alcohol and drugs are not the only addictions looming over US college students heads. This article reveals that cut off from the Internet, social media, cell phones and devices like iPods and TVs, students experience agitation, aggression, slight depression and a sudden overabundance of time.

PRLog: Some basic addiction statistics.  In 2001 almost thirty percent of kids between the ages of twelve and seventeen reported using drugs.

Smoking

Medical News Today: This article discusses a study which found that Arizona’s smoking ban reduced hospital visits.  Since the 2007 state law took effect, admissions for ailments related to secondhand smoke have declined by as much as 33 percent.

Health Today: A new study found that Americans could suffer 18,000 fewer attacks per year, save millions in health costs if all states banned smoking in restaurants, offices and other public spaces nationwide.

Medical News Today: The medical marijuana boom is always a prevalent topic. According to this article, fourteen states in the US plus the District of Columbia have passed laws intended to give certain ill people legal access to medical marijuana.

Other Drugs

Harm Reduction Journal: This is about a case study examining the closure of a large urban fixed site needle exchange in Canada. The article concludes that closing the fixed site needle exchange had an adverse effect on already vulnerable clients and reduced access to effective comprehensive harm reduction services.

AP News Break: The investment and crackdown of drug war in Mexico have failed to halt drug-related violence, which has killed 23,000 Mexicans in the past three years, or the availability of drugs in the U.S. marketplace, the world’s biggest. Obama said Tuesday that he would send as many as 1,200 National Guard troops back to the US- Mexico boarder to help battle illegal immigration and drug smuggling.

Science Daily: Researchers at Harvard-affiliated McLean Hospital have produced the first evidence that the opioid blocker extended-release injectable naltrexone (XR-NTX) is able to reduce the brain’s response to cues that may cause alcoholics to relapse.

About Addiction: Your brain, smoking, alcohol and drugs

Some new, different areas of addiction and some old favorites.  Read on to learn more!

Check out this USA Today story about President Obama’s public health fight and goals of reducing drug usage.  He said prevention and education are really what we need.

Your Brain and Addiction

Science Daily: A genetic variant of a receptor in the brain’s reward circuitry plays an important role in determining whether the neurotransmitter dopamine is released in the brain following alcohol intake.

Health Day: Children who experience psychological disorders such as depression and substance abuse appear to be headed for a financially depressed adulthood.

Science Daily: This article investigates separate and joint effects of alcohol and tobacco on the nucleus accumbens. A new study has found that alcohol abuse elevated the expression of a distinct set of genes in the NAC and VTA while nicotine blunted this effect in the VTA.

Alcohol

APP: This article talks about a new study on alcohol use of teens. The Partnership for a Drug Free America found in a study released in March an 11 percent increase among students in grades 9-12 who reported drinking alcohol in the past month, up to 39 percent in 2009, or 6.5 million students.

Science Daily: This article suggests that frequent alcohol use is linked to faster HIV disease progression. According to the article, HIV disease tends to progress at a faster rate in infected individuals who consume two or more alcoholic drinks a day.

Associated Press: This is a link to a short text which states that the World Health Organization endorsed a global strategy to reduce alcohol abuse. This text calls alcohol use one of the leading causes of sickness and death.

Smoking

Physorg.com: In a new study was found that treatment for smoking dependence is as effective among people with severe mental illnesses as it is for the general population.

Cesar Fax: This  states that cigarette excise tax increased in fifteen states in 2009. Four states have not increased cigarette taxes in more than a decade.

Other Drugs

Reuters: Prescription drug use of US children has risen. Children were the leading growth demographic for the pharmaceutical industry in 2009, with the increase of prescription drug use among youngsters nearly four times higher than in the overall population.

Medical News Today: There are significant changes in substance use treatment admissions patterns that have occurred over the past decade. The co-abuse of alcohol and drugs has declined gradually yet significantly.

About Addiction: Smoking, Drugs, Drinking and Cancer

New links for interesting articles about addiction. Check them out!

Tobacco, nicotine, and Smoking

Medical News Today: According to a recent study in China there is a new effective strategy for treating tobacco addiction.  Researchers have developed a novel tea filter that seems to help with cigarette addiction. (Note: this link doesn’t give direct access to the article so we’re basing the summary on the article itself)

SAMHSA: According to a new nationwide study, adolescent smoking may be influenced by mothers’ smoking or depression. The study states that adolescents living with mothers who smoke are 25.6% more likely to smoke. It’s frightening to think that 1.4 million 11-17 year old kids started smoking in the past 12 months!

Science Daily: Exposure to prenatal smoking may lead to psychiatric problems. According to new research, exposure to prenatal smoking can increase the need for psychotropic medications in childhood and young adulthood.

Hard drugs

Science Daily:  A newly developed and tested modified enzyme has been shown to break down cocaine into inactive products nearly 1000 times faster than the human body. The article states further that cocaine toxicity due to drug overdose results in more than half a million emergency room visits annually. This new enzyme could help prevent OD deaths by breaking down the drug.

Fox News: The number of soldiers seeking opiate abuse treatment has been increasing, going up from 89 in 2004 to 529 last year.

Addiction Inbox: A study that uses the Stroop test (have to name the colors of words and not the words themselves) seems to be a good predictor for addiction treatment effectiveness and drop out rates. Pretty cool stuff!

Alcohol

Join Together: This is a short article summarizing research which shows that rare childhood leukemia is tied to drinking during pregnancy. According to this research, children whose mothers are drinking during pregnancy are 56 percent more likely to develop a rear form of leukemia called AML.

Addiction Tomorrow: Britain is considering raising the prices of their very low-end alcohols most likely in an attempt to damper the young adults that binge drink and of alcoholics since they are most often the ones that drink the low-end alcohol.

About Addiction: HIV, smoking, obesity and steroids

We have some wonderful new links about addiction for you to explore and learn through:

Clinical Trials (for anyone interested in participating):  This is the description of a study which is currently recruiting participants to test the neurocognitive effects of buprenorphine among HIV positive and HIV negative opioid-users. The researchers hypothesize that the reasoning abilities of HIV positive participants will be lower than of HIV negative participants.

Science Daily: researchers have developed a technique to visualize the activity of the brain reward circuitry in addicts and non-addicts. This exciting development might help in finding the right treatment strategy for addicts.

Health Day: Three new studies find more evidence that smoking is affected by genes. One study found three genetic regions associated with the amount of cigarettes smoked per day by a person.

UCLA Newsroom: A new study at UCLA found that more than a third of drinkers which are 60 years old and older consume excessive amounts of alcohol. This might be potentially harmful in relation to diseases they may have or medication they may be taking.

Reuters: Obesity and smoking may raise blood clot risk.

Los Angeles Times: An article from the Los Angeles Times about steroid damage. According to the article, long-term use of anabolic steroids damages the heart more than researchers believed.