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Drug use norms and expectations: Obsessions and compulsions in our society.

teensI used to always say, back in my using days, that speed (methamphetamine) was The American drug. Why? Meth makes its users sharper, more alert, and more focused, and it allowed me to spend entire nights up studying like I’d never been able to study before.

Unfortunately, like many other aspects of The American Dream, speed will also leave you spent before you know it, leaving the memories of those productive, focused, days far behind with little hope of coming back.

We live in a society that celebrates excess, be it in celebration or dedication to work, success, and achievement. Is it any wonder then that so many Americans turn whichever way they can to gain the edge that they feel they’re lacking when they compare themselves to those around them?

I read recently that many executives now keep a supply of medications like Adderall, Ritalin, and other attention deficit cures around for times when they need that extra push to stay up late and work.

We are skirting a dangerous line by putting out the message that everyone should be the best though of course, with no cheating… or at least no getting caught.

Teens are now using more and more prescription drugs while reducing, or at least not increasing, their use of many illicit, or illegal substances. How is this crisis we’re experiencing with our teens any different than the recent steroid stories exploding the mythic innocence of every American sport?

One of the things I want to inform my readers about in writing this blog is the process of addiction and the ways in which its development is often not under the control of the users, at least not the users likely to eventually develop into addicts. But, there’s also a different issue, the one having to do with what it is about our society that makes Americans so much more likely to turn to these substances in the first place???

It is estimated that more than a third (110 Million to be exact) of American have used at least one drug at some point in their lives. I don’t necessarily think that there is anything wrong per se with recreational drug use given the relatively low rates of addiction that develop from it. However, I think that drug use, even recreational use, that is meant to solve a problem or that is done as a normal part of life, is more likely to become problematic.

Some theories of addiction specifically assert that “self-medication”, as in using a drug to alleviate problems, especially psychological problems, can be a major indication of likely addiction potential. The problem is that the unsupervised use of the drug often does little to help the initial difficulties, and if anything, makes things worse as the drug user becomes more involved in the illegal drug culture. I probably don’t need to tell many of you about the social withdrawal and added psychological stress that goes along with becoming, or living with, a drug user.

My point is that we need to change the way we think about drugs in general. Drugs can be useful for many specific medical and psychological benefits, and possibly even for their recreational benefit (think Van Gough, or

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